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Wardrobe Wednesday: Tumbling Block Prints from Eley Kishimoto and 1883

Eley Kishimoto's Spring 2013 collection featured the classic tumbling block pattern on dresses, Clarks desert boots, pants, and even socks.  Design duo Mark Eley and Wakako Kishimoto are the self-proclaimed “patron saints of print,” and their prints have graced the runways of Louis Vuitton, Marc Jacobs, Alexander McQueen, Alber Elbaz and Jil Sander.  They launched their own line in the mid-90s and have served as creative directors for both Cacharel and Laura Ashley London.

From our archives, a tumbling block print by McNaugton and Thorn from 1883. 

For more coverage check out, New York Magazine and Raw Shoes.

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